From New York to Lima, Local Resistance and Global Struggle for Climate Justice

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Growing the Roots to Weather the Storm — From New York to Lima, Local Resistance and Global Struggle for Climate Justice.

What does global climate resistance look like?

Rising Tide North America is compiling a new collection of art and essays for the COP 20 UN climate negotiations in Lima, this December 1-12, aimed at answering this questions and others.  The compilation will follow the successful launch Growing the Roots to Weather the Storm made in conjunction with the People’s Climate March.

Join the important discussion and share your perspectives on UN climate negotiations, real alternatives to neoliberalism and the climate crisis and what powerful local and global resistance to carbon emissions might look like.  Submissions should be 500 to 1,500 words and submitted to analysis@RisingTideNorthAmerica.org by December 5, 2015 for the print edition and added to growingdeeproots.risingtidenorthamerica.org  on a rolling basis.  Illustrations, cartoons, poems, drawings and photographs are welcome.

COP organizers have stated that the objective of COP21 in Paris is to achieve, for the first time in over 20 years of UN negotiations, a binding and universal agreement on climate, from all the nations of the world. In early 2014, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon heralded the UN climate change summit in New York this September — which did draw up to 400,000 people marching for climate solutions and #FloodWallStreet, a mass direct action that shut down parts of the financial district for hours — as a critical step on the road to Paris, but failed to even mention the actual negotiations happening in Lima, Peru this December.

But a giant is stirring. Latin American and global social movements are mobilizing for Lima and will not be ignored as global elites negotiate away our future behind closed doors. Local grassroots efforts have organized convergence spaces, a Cumbre de Pueblos (People’s Summit) and mass march for December 10. Rising Tide allies with the Caravana Climatica have traveled from Mexico to Peru connecting communities struggling for climate justice along the way. Compañerxs from all over the region, and world, are also converging in Lima.

At the same time, new movements are rising up from the U.S. midwest to Guerrero, Mexico to confront state violence and racism.

The current climate negotiations have generated a significant amount of excitement and engagement in communities across the globe.  But the focus on negotiations in the global north and the UN legislative process raises some important questions for organizers committed to confronting the root causes of climate change:

  • UN summits and negotiations bring together those fighting for climate justice from around the world. Can we use this moment to envision a global, interconnected, radical climate justice movement? What would this movement look like? What power could it have?

  • How can global resistance align with local work in a way that emphasizes and reinforces, and does not distract from local struggles?

  • What do the recent uprisings against racism and state violence in Ferguson, Missouri and Ayotzinapa, Guerrero mean for the climate movements and intersectional movement building?

  • Can we use the negotiations in Lima to amplify our ongoing community based work resisting the carbon economy? How can we use moments like this to build capacity for radical climate justice organizing?

  • What opportunities stem from negotiations based in Lima close to robust Andian indigenous movements, movements for the rights of mother nature and the South American turn against neoliberalism?

  • What does it mean that the UN trumpets meetings in global finance centers like New York and Paris but brushes Lima under the rug?

  • How should we critique the UN process, dominated by political elites, and by proxy, their corporate allies?

  • What solutions for climate justice exist outside the UN process? What does radical or transformative climate organizing look like on a global scale?

  • What does radical or transformative climate organizing mean to you?

There are exciting and dynamic possibilities for using moments like this to amplify grassroots work, raise the voices of frontline communities, and build a stronger, bolder, and more connected climate justice movement.  But taking advantage of this opportunity requires careful and deliberate thought and analysis and strategic action.

Rising Tide North America is compiling a new collection of essays for the convergence of People’s movements in Lima that is aimed at answering these questions and others.  The title of the compilation will be “Growing the Roots to Weather the Storm—From New York to Lima, Local Resistance and Global Struggle for Climate Justice.”

Join the important discussion and share your perspectives.  Submissions should be 500 to 1,500 words and submitted to analysis@RisingTideNorthAmerica.org by December 5, 2015 for the print edition and added to growingdeeproots.risingtidenorthamerica.org  on a rolling basis.  Illustrations, cartoons, poems, drawings and photographs are welcome.

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